Fun Facts about  Martin County Florida

 

 

 

Facts About Stuart Fl

Stuart is a city in and county seat of Martin County, Florida. Located on Florida's Treasure Coast, Stuart is the largest of four incorporated municipalities in Martin County.

  • History:
  • In the 18th century, several Spanish galleons were shipwrecked in the Martin County area of Florida's Treasure Coast. The multiple wrecks were reportedly the result of a hurricane, and the ships were carrying unknown quantities of gold and silver. Some of this treasure has since been recovered, and its presence resulted in the region's name.
  • The historic Dudley-Bessey House on SW Atlanta Avenue is now a law office
  • In 1832, pirate Pedro Gilbert who often used a sandbar off the coast as a lure to unsuspecting prey, chased and caught the Mexican, a US merchant ship. Although he attempted to burn the ship and kill the crew, they survived to report the incident, ultimately resulting in the capture and subsequent execution of Gilbert and his crew.The bar from which is lured his intended booty is named "Gilbert's Bar" on nautical charts.
  • The Old Martin County Courthouse, built in 1937, now the Courthouse Cultural Center The Treasure Coast area that became Stuart was first settled by non-Native Americans in 1870.
  • In 1875, a United States Lifesaving Station was established on Hutchinson Island, near Stuart. Today, the station is known as Gilbert's Bar House of Refuge and is on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Stuart riverwalk before damaged from Hurricane Jeanne From 1893-1895, the area was called Potsdam. This name was chosen by Otto Stypmann, a local landowner originally from Potsdam, Germany. Stypmann, with his brother Ernest, owned the land that would become downtown Stuart. Potsdam was renamed Stuart in 1895, after the establishment of the Florida East Coast Railway, in honor of Homer Hine Stuart, Jr., another local landowner.
  • When Stuart was incorporated as a town in 1914, it was located in Palm Beach County. In 1925, Stuart was chartered as a city and named the county seat of the newly created Martin County.
  • The city of Stuart is known as the Sailfish Capital of the World, because of the many sailfish found in the ocean off Martin County.
  • Geography:
  • Stuart is located at 27°11′32″N 80°14′35″W.
  • According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.5 square miles (22 km2), of which 6.3 square miles (16 km2) is land and 2.2 square miles (5.7 km2) is water.
  • Climate:
  • According to the Köppen Climate Classification, Stuart, Florida lies in the tropical wet climate.
  • Like other areas along the south-central Florida Atlantic coast, Stuart is located in the broad transition zone from subtropical to tropical climates. As such, a few times each decade temperatures in Stuart will fall to near the freezing mark away from the beaches and coastal areas.
  • There is no known record of snow or snow flurries in Stuart. Because of the year round warm and sunny weather, warm Atlantic seas, and location adjacent to the Gulf Stream Current, Stuart is one of the centers of charter fishing in Florida.
  • Stuart has two seasons - a hot and wet season (late May through October) and the warm and dry season (November through April).
  • Like other areas in central and southern Florida, there is a distinct change in the mean direction in prevailing winds between these two seasons: During the wet season prevailing winds are from southeast (tropical) while during the dry season they are from the northwest (continental). While the wet season (summer) in Stuart can bring brief, but heavy rain (August averages over 8 inches). The dry season (winter) can be so severe that often forest and brush fires are a concern, and water restrictions are imposed. Like most locations in Florida, Stuart enjoys a high number of sunny days, averaging 2900 hrs annually.
  • Over the years several tropical cyclones have passed near Stuart area. Major hurricanes impacted the Stuart area in 1928, 1933, 1947, 1949, and 1977 (Hurricane David). In the more recent past, in 2004, two tropical cyclones passed near Stuart, Frances and Jeanne causing moderate damage in the area.
  • Demographics:
  • As of the census[1] of 2010, there were 15,593 people, 7,220 households, and 3,422 families residing in the city.
  • The population density was 2,320.5 per square mile (896.0 /km2).
  • There were 8,777 housing units at an average density of 1,391.9 per square mile (537.4 /km2).
  • The racial makeup of the city was 83.30% White, 12.33% African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.66% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.97% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.29% of the population.
  • There were 7,220 households out of which 15.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.7% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 52.6% were non-families. 46.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 26.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
  • The average household size was 1.88 and the average family size was 2.60.
  • In the city the population was spread out with 14.5% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 24.5% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 32.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48 years. For every 100 females there were 87.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males.
  • Public health and safety:
  • Stuart hosts one of the two Florida Department of Health offices in Martin County, the other being in Indiantown.
  • Personal income:
  • The median income for a household in the city was $35,954, and the median income for a family was $47,736. Males had a median income of $29,151 versus $23,125 for females. The per capita income for the city was $25,020. About 7.8% of families and 11.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.5% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.
  • Stuart is publicly seen as a new coming old city, starting a new boom in its local economy with construction of a new bridge, rise of new buildings and roadways being restored.
  • The cost of living in Stuart is 87.5, which is lower than the U.S. average of 100.
  • Industry:
  • Various businesses cater to tourists, such as fishing charters, boating charters, sailing, cruises , SCUBA and snorkeling, and nature tours Top employers[edit] According to the City's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[11] the top employers in the Stuart area are: # Employer # of Employees Martin Health System 2,825 2 Martin County School District 2,566 3 Martin County 1,566 4 Publix 1,276 5 State of Florida 637 6 iVox Solutions 532 7 TurboCombustor Technology 420 8 Winn-Dixie 329 9 Liberator Medical Supply 319 10 Florida Power & Light 303
  • Transportation:
  • Witham Field is a public-use airport located 1 mile southeast of the central business district. Local transit is provided by the county. 
  • Education:
  • South Fork High School
  • Martin County High School
  • Redeemer Lutheran School
  • St. Joseph Catholic School
  • Pinewood Elementary
  • Port Salerno Elementary
  • Murray Middle School
  • Hidden Oaks Middle School
  • Stuart Middle School
  • J.D. Parker School of Science, Math and Technology
  • Anderson Middle School
  • Crystal Lake Elementary
  • Community Christian Academy
  • Hobe Sound Christian Academy
  • Clark Advanced Learning Center
  • The Pine School
  • Neighborhoods inside city limits:
  • St. Lucie Estates Towne Park Windermere Indian Pines The Crossings Parkview Astorwood Ocean Boulevard area Downtown Stuart North River Shores Palm Lake Park Willoughby Golf Club.
  • Arts and culture:
  • Stuart Heritage Museum Audubon of Martin County, Blake Library Lyric Theatre Stuart Heritage Museum Elliott Museum The Barn Theatre.
  • Neighborhoods:
  • St. Lucie Estates
  • Windermere
  • Indian Pines
  • The Crossings
  • Parkview
  • Astorwood
  • Ocean Boulevard area
  • Downtown Stuart
  • North River Shores
  • Palm Lake Park
  • Willoughby Golf Club
  • Town Park
  • Notable people: 
  • Chris Marquette, actor
  • Cleveland Gary, professional football player
  • Corey McIntyre, professional football player
  • Dan Bakkedahl, Correspondent on the Daily Show
  • Derek Fathauer, professional golfer who currently plays on the PGA Tour
  • Ed Hearn, Major League Baseball player and motivational speaker
  • James Davis, professional football player
  • James Gould Cozzens, Pulitzer Prize-winning author
  • John McHale, player and executive in Major League Baseball
  • Judge Reinhold, actor
  • Kathy Rinaldi, professional tennis player
  • Kelly Carrington, Playboy Playmate October 2008
  • Lee Rinker, PGA Tour Golf player
  • Nelson Burton Jr., professional bowler and longtime TV analyst
  • Ralph Evinrude CEO of Outboard Motor Company with a test facility in Stuart, married Frances Langford and retired to Jensen Beach.
  • Rusty Meacham, former Major League Baseball player
  • Roger Schank, leading visionary in Artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and learning theory
  • Scott Proctor, pitcher for the Doosan Bears of the Korea Baseball Organization
  • Whitney Gaskell, novelist
  • Willie Gary, attorney, lives in Sewall's Point and has an office in Stuart
  • Zack Mosley, cartoonist and creator of The Adventures of Smilin' Jack
  • Municipalities and communities of Martin County Florida:
  • Stuart City Stuart Towns Jupiter Island Ocean Breeze Park Sewall's Point CDPs Hobe Sound Indiantown Jensen Beach North River Shores Palm City Port Salerno Rio Unincorporated community Port Mayaca

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Facts about Jensen Beach Fl

  • General Facts:
  • Jensen Beach is a census-designated place (CDP) in Martin County, Florida, United States.
  • The population was 11,707 at the 2010 census.
  • It is part of the Port St. Lucie, Florida Metropolitan Statistical Area.
  • According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 8.1 square miles (21.0 km2), of which 7.2 square miles (18.6 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) is water.
  • Ocean Breeze Park is an incorporated town located within unincorporated Jensen Beach.
  • Waveland was the original name for the area from Crossroads Hill (south of N.E. Center Street) south to the tip of Sewall's Point and west to Warner Creek.
  • "Jensen" originally meant the area immediately adjacent to today's Downtown Jensen Beach.
  • Jensen Beach was rated the "Top Spot for Beach Volleyball" in 2008 by the "Prime Time Magazine" is a part of the Treasure Coast which derives its name from the ships that wrecked during the 17th century because of coral reefs in the shallow waters. Artifacts and treasures from these ships of Spanish origin can still be discovered today.
  • The Skyline Drive area is among the highest points in south Florida.
  • Government:
  • Jensen Beach is an unincorporated town located in Martin County, governed by County Commissioners.
  • Martin County is divided into 5 districts.
  • Jensen Beach is represented by Doug Smith as part of District 1.
  • Demographics:
  • As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 11,100 people, 5,059 households, and 3,025 families residing in the CDP.
  • The population density was 1,531.8 per square mile (591.4 /km2).
  • There were 5,805 housing units at an average density of 801.1 per square mile (309.3 /km2).
  • The racial makeup of the CDP was 95.80% White, 2.25% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.37% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.77% of the population.
  • There were 5,059 households out of which 23.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.2% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.2% were non-families. 33.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
  • The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.78. 20.0% of the population was under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 23.8% were 65 or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males.
  • For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.7 males.
  • The median income for a household in the CDP was $36,674, and the median income for a family was $49,787.
  • Males had a median income of $34,368 versus $25,118 for females.
  • The per capita income for the CDP was $22,921. 8.3% of the population and 5.0% of families were below the poverty line. 8.4% of those under the age of 18 and 7.4% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.
  • Recreation:
  • The main public beach in Jensen Beach is on Hutchinson Island and is called Jensen Sea Turtle Beach. It's a wide sandy beach on the Atlantic Ocean.
  • Martin County life guards are in attendance.
  • The beach is used for sun bathing, surfing, and swimming.
  • Ecology:
  • Sections of the beach where sea turtles lay their eggs are blocked off. Jensen Beach is known in the marine biology community for being a location for sea turtles to nest. Designated sections of the Jensen Sea Turtle Beach are barricaded off in order to protect the nests of the sea turtles. The three species found on this beach are the loggerhead, leatherback turtle and green sea turtle. Loggerhead nests are the most common type found on this and adjacent beaches. Locations of the sea turtle’s nests are marked with the approximate date in which the eggs were laid and the expected date in which the eggs will hatch. These notifications are meant to discourage tourists and residents from visiting the beach in the evening hours during these time periods. Efforts are made to protect both species of sea turtles since nests have been declining in recent years due to the severe erosion of the beach.
  • History:
  • The history of Jensen Beach in the 19th century revolves around pineapple farming.
  • John Laurence Jensen, an immigrant from Denmark, arrived in 1881, and set up his pineapple plantation, which became the town of Jensen.
  • By 1894, the Florida East Coast Railway reached Jensen Beach, and freight shipments were loaded directly onto the freight cars.
  • By 1895, Jensen was called the “Pineapple Capital of the World,” shipping over one million boxes of pineapples each year during the June and July season[3] To help deal with the increased Pineapple production, a Pineapple Factory was built. A hard freeze in 1895 devastated most of the small pineapple plantations. Also, two fires, 1908 and 1910, destroyed most of Jensen Beach and its remaining Pineapple farms. The industry finally collapsed in 1920 due to a wide variety of financial and agriculture problems. Growers decided to turn their efforts in another direction: raising citrus.
  • The pineapple has become a symbol of Jensen Beach.
  • The fruit legacy is celebrated annually during the Jensen Beach Pineapple Festival.
  • In 2004 Jensen Beach was hit by two hurricanes. On September 5, 2004, Hurricane Frances made landfall at Hutchinson Island with winds of 105 mph. On September 25, 2004, Hurricane Jeanne made landfall on Hutchinson Island with winds of 120 mph.
  • The Saint Joseph College of Florida was in Jensen.
  • Historic Landmarks:
  • All Saints Episcopal Church erected in 1898 is the oldest church building in Jensen Beach as well as in Martin County. Adjacent to the church is All Saints Cemetery which is non-sectarian and serves the whole community.
  • Capt. John Miller House (private) on Indian River Drive in Eden, built by an early settler in the late 1890s
  • Jensen Beach Christian Church built in 1910-1912
  • Capt. Henry E. Sewall House, now located in Indian RiverSide Park
  • The Mansion at Tuckahoe in IndianRiverside Park
  • Mount Elizabeth Archeological Site in IndianRiverside Park
  • Stuart Welcome Arch, on State Road 707, N.E. Dixie Highway
  • Economics:
  • St. Martin de Porres Catholic Church in Jensen Beach Jensen Beach Christian Church in downtown Jensen Downtown Jensen Beach is the site of the annual Pineapple Festival.
  • Education:
  • Jensen Beach High School.The 2006 Florida Teacher of the Year, Connie Dahn, teaches there. Jensen Beach Elementary Felix A. Williams Elementary The Environmental Studies Center Media
  • Historic landmarks:
  • All Saints Episcopal Church erected in 1898 is the oldest church building in Jensen Beach as well as in Martin County. Adjacent to the church is All Saints Cemetery which is non-sectarian and serves the whole community.
  • Capt. John Miller House (private) on Indian River Drive in Eden, built by an early settler in the late 1890s Jensen Beach Christian Church built in 1910-1912
  • Capt. Henry E. Sewall House, now located in Indian RiverSide Park The Mansion at Tuckahoe in IndianRiverside Park Mount Elizabeth Archeological Site in IndianRiverside Park Stuart Welcome Arch, on State Road 707, N.E. Dixie Highway Sister cities[edit] Jensen Beach has been the sister city of Gregory Town in the Bahamas since July 1989.
  • Notable people:
  • Ralph Evinrude CEO of Outboard Motor Company with a test facility in Stuart, married Frances Langford and retired to Jensen Beach.
  • Derek Fathauer (1986–Present), PGA Tour Professional Golfer.
  • Frances Langford (1913–2005), singer and entertainer Bobby Lord (1934–2008), country singer.
  • Jennifer Sky (born Jennifer Kathleen Wacha) American actress
  • Scott Proctor American Baseball player *pitcher* 

​******* Above information shared from Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization

 

 

Facts About Palm City

 

  • Palm City is a census-designated place (CDP) in Martin County, Florida, United States.
  • The population was 23,120 at the 2010 census.
  • Geography:
  • Palm City is located at 27°10′16″N 80°16′43″W (27.171127, -80.278657).
  • According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 16.6 square miles (43 km2), of which, 14.6 square miles (38 km2) of it is land and 2.0 square miles (5.2 km2) of it (11.76%) is water.
  • Government:
  • Palm City is an unincorporated town located in Martin County, governed by County Commissioners.
  • Martin County is divided into 5 districts.
  • Palm City is represented by John Haddox as part of District 5.
  • Demographics:
  • As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 20,097 people, 8,458 households, and 6,301 families residing in the CDP.
  • The population density was 1,373.4 people per square mile (530.4/km²).
  • There were 9,228 housing units at an average density of 630.6/sq mi (243.5/km²).
  • The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.56% White, 1.08% African American, 0.13% Native American, 1.03% Asian, 0.40% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.77% of the population.
  • There were 8,458 households out of which 27.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.2% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.5% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
  • The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.72.
  • In the CDP the population was spread out with 21.1% under the age of 18, 3.3% from 18 to 24, 22.5% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 27.3% who were 65 years of age or older.
  • The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 91.9 males.
  • For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.
  • The median income for a household in the CDP was $62,362, and the median income for a family was $69,688 (these figures had risen to $67,546 and $84,000 respectively as of a 2007 estimate[4]).
  • Males had a median income of $48,852 versus $33,699 for females.
  • The per capita income for the CDP was $35,213.
  • About 2.6% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.3% of those under age 18 and 1.6% of those age 65 or over.
  • Education:
  • Crystal Lake Elementary School
  • Hidden Oaks Middle School
  • Bessey Creek Elementary School
  • Citrus Grove Elementary School
  • Palm City Elementary School PCE
  • Peace Christian Academy (K-12)
  • Neighborhoods:
  • Bay Pointe
  • Canoe Creek
  • Carmel
  • Charter Club
  • Cobblestone Country Club
  • Copperleaf
  • Canopy Creek
  • Crane Creek
  • Cypress Lake
  • Danforth
  • Evergreen Golf Club
  • Four Rivers
  • Fox Run
  • Grenada
  • Hammock Creek Estates
  • Hammock Creek Preserve
  • Hammock Creek Sanctuary
  • Harbour Pointe
  • Harbour Ridge
  • Hidden Bay
  • Highland Reserve
  • Hunter's Creek
  • Islesworth
  • Lake Grove
  • Lake Village, formerly The Crossings
  • La Mariposa
  • Lighthouse Point
  • Meadows
  • Martin Downs Country Club
  • Murano
  • Number Streets
  • Oak Ridge
  • Old Palm City
  • Orchid Bay
  • Palm City Farms
  • Palm Cove Golf & Yacht Club
  • Palm Isles
  • Palm Pointe
  • Parkside
  • Pelican Cove
  • Pine Ridge
  • Pipers Landing
  • River Landing
  • Rustic Hills
  • Sea Gate Harbor
  • Sawgrass Villas
  • St. Lucie Shores
  • Stratford Downs
  • Stuart West
  • Sunset Trace
  • Tiburon
  • Westwood County Estates
  • Windston
  • Notable People:
  • Ken Duke - PGA Professional Golfer

 

*** Above information shared from Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization

 

 

Facts About Hobe Sound Fl

 

  • General Facts:
  • Hobe Sound is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in Martin County, Florida, United States.
  • The population was 11,521 at the 2010 census.
  • Hobe Sound is located at 27°04′36″N 80°08′31″W.[3] Hobe Sound is an exurban area in southern Martin County near the Atlantic Ocean. It stretches along the coast between Port Salerno and Jonathan Dickinson State Park but does include Jupiter Island.
  • Its western border is not clearly defined though most development drops off only a few miles inland at Powerline Road.
  • According to the United States Census Bureau, Hobe Sound has a total area of 5.7 square miles (15 km2)— 5.5 square miles (14 km2) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) of it (4.71%) is water.
  • Hobe Sound has a tropical savanna climate, closely bordering a subtropical climate to the north.
  • The average high in January is 74 °F; in July and August it is 90 °F.
  • History:
  • The name of Hobe Sound comes from the name of the Jove or Jobe Indians, one of the Native American groups that lived in the area before European settlement. The Spanish pronounced Jove/Jobe as [ˈxoβe], which later evolved into the current spelling "Hobe".
  • The earliest recorded European contact occurred in 1696 when a British ship, the barkentine (three-masted ship) Reformation, sailing from Jamaica to Philadelphia sank close to the shore north of Jupiter Inlet, carrying 25 passengers and crew and a cargo of sugar, rum, beef, molasses, and Spanish currency. The small Quaker party, including its most notable passenger, Jonathan Dickinson, encountered and received aid from the Jove Indians.
  • Hobe Sound received its name by 1699, according to the Florida WPA Guide.
  • Parts of Hobe Sound were included in the 12,000 acres (49 km) of the Gomez grant given by Spain to Don Eusebio in 1815.
  • In 1821, Gomez sold 8,000 acres (32 km2), including Jupiter Island, to Joseph Delespine for $1 per acre. Shortly after the turn of the 20th century, Henry Flagler built his railroad along the east coast of Florida passing through Hobe Sound. This gradually created many opportunities including jobs, the birth of tourism, and other related industries.
  • A 'Bubble House' in Hobe Sound During the land boom of the 1920s elaborate plans were announced for Hobe Sound by the Olympia Improvement Corporation. Their goal was to create a town, in Greek style, where motion pictures could be produced.
  • Street names bore the Greek theme with names such as Zeus, Saturn, Mercury, Mars, Olympus, Venus, Pluto and Athena.
  • For a brief time Hobe Sound was renamed "Picture City" and plans were presented for a movie picture production center.
  • The boom collapsed after the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane and the original name was restored. Street names remained, however, as did the cement streetlights along Dixie Highway.
  • In 1924, the building which soon would become the new schoolhouse in Hobe Sound was constructed. The Martin County Board of Public Instruction secured the use of the new school building from the Picture City Corporation in 1925, and in October of that year, the Olympia School opened. The school was designated the “Picture City School” of Martin County. It remained in use as a school until 1962. Now known as the Apollo School, the building is currently being restored. Other mementos of the past are gone, including the ice plant, which was south of Bridge Road, and the old train station, which now, refurbished and relocated west of Hobe Sound, serves as an office building for Becker Groves and the Texaco station east of the Winn-Dixie plaza, which no longer supplies gasoline but continues to serve the community with car rentals and a livery service, operated by its founding family.
  • Hobe Sound is positioned at the southern end of environmentally-sensitive Martin (named after Governor Martin) County. It has been stated that at Hobe Sound’s front door lies the Gold Coast and that at her back door lies the Treasure Coast. Thus, Hobe Sound can lend to both while retaining its proud heritage and unique personality. Hobe Sound’s proximity to the coast affords immediate access to the Atlantic Ocean and the deep-channeled Intracoastal Waterway, a 1,200-mile (1,900 km) water route that provides a sheltered passage for boats along the eastern seaboard.
  • Another significant historical association possessed by Hobe Sound is the brief stay there of former Defense Secretary James Forrestal in 1949 between his resignation from that post and his death.
  • March 15, 1997: During a stay at golfer Greg Norman's Jupiter Island Estate, after conversing late into the night, Norman was escorting Clinton to a cottage on his estate when the president fell while descending four dark-wood steps to a stone landing. In the darkness, he apparently misjudged the final step, said White House Press Secretary Michael D. McCurry. ``He remembers his right knee buckling out. He heard a very loud pop, said Navy Capt. Connie Mariano, the president's personal physician. Alcohol was not a factor, Mariano told reporters while still in Florida. Paramedics at Norman's estate rushed to the president's side. They found Clinton lying on the ground being comforted by Norman and a Secret Service agent. The paramedics checked Clinton's vital signs, put ice and a splint on his leg and put him into an ambulance.
  • Hobe Sound is a predominantly wealthy community whose residents include such celebrities as "Tiger" Woods, Alan Jackson, Celine Dion, and Burt Reynolds among others.
  • Police protection for Hobe Sound is provided by the Martin County Sheriff's Department.
  • The Martin County Fire Rescue Department provides modern fire, rescue, as well as EMS Services.
  • State-of-the-art EMS services are also provided by the Martin Health System.
  • Counties:
  • Hobe Sound has been part of the following counties: St. Johns County 1821-1824 Mosquito County, now Orange County 1824-1844 Brevard County, 1844-1866 Note: The present day Brevard County was known as St. Lucie County from 1844-1855, but it was not the same county as today's St. Lucie County Dade County 1866-1909 Palm Beach County 1909-1925 Martin County 1925–present
  • Government:
  • Hobe Sound is an unincorporated town located in Martin County. Governed by County Commissioners.
  • Martin County is divided into 5 districts. Hobe Sound is located in district 3 and the county commissioner is Anne Scott. District 3 also includes a portion of Tequesta in southern Martin County.
  • The Tax Collector, Supervisor of Elections, Clerk of Circuit Court and Property Appraiser each have satellite offices in Hobe Sound at The Island Crossing Plaza.
  • Demographics:
  • As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 11,376 people, 5,176 households, and 3,266 families residing in the CDP.
  • The population density was 2,082.8 persons per square mile (804.5/km2).
  • There were 6,042 housing units at an average density of 1,106.2 houses per square mile (427.3/km2).
  • The racial makeup of the CDP was 91.98% White, 5.79% African American, 0.15% Native American, 0.60% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.64% from other races, and 0.81% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.22% of the population.
  • There were 5,176 households out of which 18.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.9% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
  • The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.66.
  • In the CDP the population was spread out with 16.8% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 20.5% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 33.0% who were 65 years of age or older.
  • The median age was 51 years.
  • For every 100 females there were 93.3 males.
  • For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.
  • The median income for a household in the CDP was $36,541, and the median income for a family was $45,412.
  • Males had a median income of $36,943 versus $27,773 for females.
  • The per capita income for the CDP was $21,603.
  • About 3.7% of families and 5.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.7% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.
  • Transportation:
  • Travel in Hobe Sound is predominantly done by private automobile.
  • There are no interstate highways in Hobe Sound.
  • The nearest, Interstate 95, is 7 miles (11 km) west.
  • Hobe Sound is dominated by US 1, a four- and six-lane arterial road that runs from north to south.
  • Other important throughways include A1A (locally known as Dixie Highway), Bridge Road, Gomez Avenue, and Osprey Street. US 1 arguably represents the central business district though some commercial activity occurs on Dixie Highway (A1A) near Bridge Road.
  • Mass transit:
  • Only a very limited public transport system exists in Hobe Sound.
  • No fixed-route services exist in Hobe Sound.
  • The Community Coach, a service of the Council on Aging of Martin County, is the public transportation service for Martin County. It operates a curb-to-curb, advance reservation, shared ride service and also operates fixed-route services in other parts of the county.
  • Railroads:
  • The Florida East Coast Railway runs through Hobe Sound parallel to A1A. At-grade crossings can be found at (from north to south) A1A, Osprey Street, Crossrip Street, Pettway Street, Bridge Road, and Gleason Street.
  • Education:
  • The Hobe Sound Bible College is the only place of higher education in Hobe Sound. Private schools include the Hobe Sound Christian Academy. Publicly run schools include Hobe Sound Elementary and Seawind Elementary Schools. Residents of Hobe Sound attend Murray Middle School and South Fork High School. The Pine School (formerly St. Michael’s Independent) is now located on its new campus in Hobe Sound. This private school has a college preparatory program and educational opportunities for 7th through 12th grade students. The campus offers education covering the basic arts (graphics, music, and media).

 

 

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Facts About Sewall's Point

 

  • General Information:
  • Sewall's Point is an affluent town located on the peninsula of the same name in Martin CountyFloridaUnited States
  • As of 2004, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 2,053
  • Both the town and the peninsula are named for Capt. Henry Edwin Sewall (August 22, 1848 – August 1, 1925)
  • Geography:
  • Sewall's Point is located at 27°12′N 80°12′W (27.195,-80.198).
  • It is bordered by water on the south, east, and west due to its peninsula shape of the entire town. On the south and east is the St. Lucie River and to the east is the Indian River Lagoon. On the north it is bordered by unincorporated Jensen Beach
  • According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 4.1 square miles (11 km2), of which, 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) of it is land and 2.9 square miles (7.5 km2) of it (70.05%) is water.
  • As of the census of 2000, there were 1,946 people, 758 households, and 607 families residing in the town.
  • The population density was 1,578.1 people per square mile (610.9/km²).
  • There were 828 housing units at an average density of 671.5 per square mile (259.9/km²).
  • The racial makeup of the town was 98.72% White, 0.41% African American, 0.41% Asian, 0.10% from other races, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.39% of the population.
  • There were 758 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.4% were married couples living together, 4.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.8% were non-families. 15.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older.
  • The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 2.85.
  • In the town the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 2.9% from 18 to 24, 19.9% from 25 to 44, 33.0% from 45 to 64, and 19.7% who were 65 years of age or older.
  • The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males.
  • The median income for a household in the town was $97,517, and the median income for a family was $104,893.
  • Males had a median income of $82,748 versus $32,500 for females.
  • The per capita income for the town was $55,121.
  • About 4.6% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.5% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.
  • On September 26, 2004, Hurricane Jeanne made landfall on Hutchinson Island, just east of Sewall's Point, exactly three weeks after Hurricane Frances did so at the same location.
  • Notable People:
  • Tori Amos, singer/pianist
  • Vaughn Monroe, baritone singer, trumpeter and big band leader and actor, lived in Sewall's Point
  • Willie Gary, attorney, lives in Sewall's Point and has on office in Stuart.

 

 

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